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Epic

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Epic

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Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at Epic.

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69 English questions out of 69

August 12, 2020

Does Epic offer massages?

Pros

-High pay for the Midwest -Good Benefits (heath insurance, sabbatical) -Good, cheap food offered for lunch -Awesome campus. Themed buildings, private offices, and free juice in the break rooms -A chance to make an impact in healthcare (depending on your app) As you can see, there's a lot of pros to Epic. Before the pandemic, I would have likely given them a 4 or a 5 star review. As it stands, their current policy regarding the pandemic outweighs all the perks of the job.

Cons

Starting with the non-pandemic cons: -TLs generally have an incentive to overwork you. If you meet all of your expectations, you will be rewarded with more work. You have to be pretty forceful and say no if you want any semblance of a work-life balance. It can be a stressful situation -Your experience at Epic will largely be determined by who your TL is. Some of them are helpful and good at managing; others, not so much -There's a lack of transparency to how you are evaluated, and how certain processes come into place -There are some outdated technologies in our tech stack And then there's the pandemic. Epic was slow to respond when COVID-19 first hit the US. Upper management referred to it as "the flu", and were hesitant to let employees work from home. They finally caved and let some employees work from home in late March, but tried to guilt us into working on campus. Starting in the summer, Epic began to make plans to force everyone back to campus, even as the number of new cases were increasing locally and nationally. Employees tried to speak up through internal channels, but were promptly shut down. The only "allowed" way to give feedback was through a private email group, where your concerns could be brushed aside. Managers who spoke up with concerns about the return-to-work policy were demoted. It took media coverage and complaints to the county health department to get Epic to even consider revising their plan of forcing everyone back to campus. Now, to their credit, it seems like they have made some good changes on campus to support safety. If it were essential for us to be working on campus at this time, the changes would be sufficient. But we don't need to work on campus to accomplish our jobs. We're a tech company. Forcing 10,000+ employees onto campus during the peak of a pandemic is irresponsible and dangerous, not only to employee health, but to the greater community. Epic should be a leader in making adjustments to keep everyone safe during this unprecedented time. Instead, they have silenced dissenters and spread lies (claiming only a "vocal minority" is concerned with their plans) to get their way, at the expense of our health. This is all very sad. It's not the Epic I know, and directly contradicts our motto of "Do Good".

Advice to Management

Actually listen to your employees, especially when it comes to the safety and health of us and our families. Don't just pretend to encourage feedback, actually survey us for our opinions, and then make changes based on that feedback.

Themed buildings, private offices, and free juice in the break rooms

August 12, 2020

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August 5, 2022

Does Epic offer dental insurance?

Pros

Good starting salary for recent graduates Impressive to have on resume Amazing campus with 5 star cafeteria Very high quality coworkers and everyone is very intelligent Training cohorts are a great way to learn, meet people, and get support Many high quality benefits including medical, dental, vision insurance; 401(k) match at 3%; 2 weeks vacation initially, increase to 3 weeks at start or third year with company; Sabbatical every 5 years (expenses covered but you have to pay the taxes); everyone gets an office (either alone) or with one coworker Opportunities to get involved in many different groups and roles

Cons

COVID response regarding employees and remote work was shameful Management quality is very hit/miss. Very intelligent people but some have no social skills, empathy, or respect for employees Very high burnout rate Extreme stress 1 year of mandatory, intensive training Countless meetings, emails and phone calls with customers and not enough time to do the amount of work expected Always expected to be doing more Have to work on campus High salary may not be worth the burnout

Advice to Management

Care about your employees.

Many high quality benefits including medical, dental, vision insurance; 401(k) match at 3%; 2 weeks vacation initially, increase to 3 weeks at start or third year with company; Sabbatical every 5 years (expenses covered but you have to pay the taxes); everyone gets an office (either alone) or with one coworker

August 5, 2022

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December 8, 2021

Does Epic offer life insurance?

Pros

+Having your own office/just one shared officemate is legitimately fantastic. Way better than my time in cubicles, crowded 4 person offices, and open offices at past jobs and internships. +Coworkers are always willing to answer questions and help each other out. +I only log ~45 hours a week or less on average, average for TS is the same, so hour expectations aren't too crazy. Learn to say no and learn what work can be tabled until the next day. IME work-life balance has been perfectly fine, but I know others feel differently. +Good internal training and classes, resources, books available to help with professional development. You gain a lot of experience in customer relationship management and project management. Other stuff like coding or analytics experience that you gain varies a ton based on your interests and the needs of your team/customers. +Lots of "opportunities" to take on. Fairly easy to become a functional area owner/lead or TC for hands on product management experience or executive customer communication +I personally really like my customer analysts and the day-to-day work, but it's a matter of luck. +Some travel, including some you get to choose to take on through go-live support shifts, without being overwhelming. +Compensation and raise structure are very good/fair to anyone who is at least meeting all expectations, and managers regularly communicate feedback/what expectations entail. I'm averaging ~10-15% raises or so over my first 3 years. Bonuses are good. Stock offers are fine. +Health insurance is great. Good life insurance covered by the company too. +Vacation starts at two weeks and goes up to three after two years (for most people), with 8 days of rollover. You get 6 sick days a year with effectively limitless rollover. 1 month sabbatical with a per diem and paid flights is really nice if you make it. +You don't need to take sick/vacation time if you're only gone for a small chunk of the day (specifically 2 hours or less). So you can head to the optometrist or dentist without needing to take sick/vacation time. +You're given a lot of independence to plan out your own work

Cons

-Extremely limited ability to work from home. -You can get whatever Epic certs you want for free, but because of the non-compete you can't actually use them to find a job that specifically takes advantage of them for a year or two after you leave Epic (depending on the terms of your non-compete). So career and salary growth within Epic are fine, but you need to stretch your legs a bit to find something outside of that sphere that offers the same compensation without a drastic change in skillset. -A lot of your experience will be dictated by your app, Team Lead, and the specific customers you're assigned to support/the analysts you work with. I thrived, but a lot of that was due to luck. I had friends who really struggled because of different external factors. -It's very sink or swim. It's easy to get a bit of responsibility/a low level leadership position, but negative feedback on that will stick with you for at least the next quarter or two and can stall out your career progress. -Dental and Vision are just ok. Other things like Culinary and oil changes on campus are *fine,* but kind of aggrandized during the recruiting process. - 401k is a meh 4% match, has a ridiculously long vesting schedule, but is true-up and run through Fidelity with low fees and good funds available. No Megabackdoor Roth FYI, but the fact that I make enough money to even care about that is nice.

Advice to Management

Continue to expand WFH flexibility options. If you care about culture, have focused communication from the perspective of being able to ask people for help, not stuff like "hallway conversations." Have TLs set expectations for worklife balance across teams. "Once decided, support." That's not useful if we're not in the room where it happens. Reframe big policy changes as proposals so you can take and address feedback in advance of the change being implemented. Don't just make the change first and say no to feedback later. Honestly, the TS role is generally a good deal if you know how to say "no" appropriately. So my other observations are really about other roles. QA/manual testing are not paid well, and I understand that a driver for that is the market pay for manual testers. But if their value is that low to management, transform the position into something valuable and compensate them accordingly. That might be setting the expectation that they need to read code and learn to set up automated tests. Or if you're going to expect them to do customer work, pay them closer to the way customer facing roles are paid. IS are bled from the company and money is not enough to get them to stay. More money is likely not the solution. Applies across the company, but especially for IS, do a better job of setting expectations around work life balance. And automate more of the install process so that there's less manual fumbling around, because I sometimes look at the swirl of a 9-15 month install and wonder what exactly was accomplished when core workflows are still broken on go-live. Objectively, the business outlook is really good for Epic. All customers that have completed an install have stayed with the company, more customers continue to roll out Epic, and Epic continue to build better support for specialty areas. A lot of limitations are now on the customer side as we implement features and depend on customer IT teams to make the system really work for end users, and they have their own struggles for very fair reasons. "On by default" and FS Turbocharges are not enough, and we need to do a better job of showing data that communicates the benefits of taking specific enhancements and really pushing customers to take on big enhancement and operational projects that other customers have found success with.

Good life insurance covered by the company too.

December 8, 2021

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July 8, 2022

Does Epic offer a wellness program?

Pros

Good starting salary, health benefits, and professional development

Cons

Wisconsin. Additionally, the non-compete can be a bit tricky afterwards. It is a relatively demanding job, but you and compensated accordingly

Advice to Management

Remote work

Good starting salary, health benefits, and professional development

July 8, 2022

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August 27, 2020

Does Epic assist with or provide work transportation?

Pros

Challenging Work and Talented People make it easy to engage in your tasks. On-site cafeteria and personal offices make it easy to stay focused. Competitive benefits for an American company

Cons

Little actual transparency in the corporate structure and direction - there's a lot of double speak and pseudo-propaganda. Expect to work a lot or fall behind.

Advice to Management

Why would management listen? Chewing up and spitting out young talent is working perfectly fine for them.

Competitive benefits for an American company

August 27, 2020

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69 English questions out of 69

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