Wiley "upper management" Reviews | Glassdoor.ca

Wiley Employee Reviews about "upper management"

Updated Jan 13, 2020

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3.3
52%
Recommend to a Friend
71%
Approve of CEO
Wiley President and Chief Executive Officer 	Brian Napack (no image)
Brian Napack
141 Ratings
Pros
Cons
  • "Admissions Upper Management is unapproachable(in 40 reviews)

  • "Employee loyalty is thrown out of the window, low pay, predictable and no room for growth(in 26 reviews)

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Reviews about "upper management"

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  1. "Production Editor"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Corporate Strategy Analyst 
    Recommends

    I worked at Wiley full-time

    Pros

    Great staff, location and office environment Excellent benefits & compensation

    Cons

    Many changes over the years Distant upper management Job mundaneness

    Wiley2020-01-13

    Wiley Response

    January 21, 2020Director

    Thanks for taking the time to write a review. Please know that we take all of the feedback seriously and use it to help steer our future direction.

    Continue reading
  2. Helpful (4)

    "Stay away if you're a hard worker, they'll take advantage of you!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Enrollment Counselor in Louisville, KY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Wiley full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    It's a full time job.

    Cons

    Unequal pay among those in the same position, horrible benefits, constantly changing job descriptions without any increase in salary, Program Managers (exact same job responsibilities as Enrollment Counselors) are paid 2x or more than ECs. (e.g. entry level EC is paid ~34k-42k, entry level PM is paid ~68k-100k, the only difference is the location - ECs are in Louisville, PMs in Orlando, where the cost of living is much less in Orlando than Louisville). After numerous attempts through various internal channels, questions concerning pay and benefits have either been brushed off, ignored or deleted altogether by those in upper management. This year as well we were told our health insurance rates were skyrocketing due to an "unfavorable premiums year" we're already paid next to nothing as it is, and our branch was the most profitable out of all the Wiley offices, yet we are not viewed as being worth the same as anyone else.

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    Wiley2019-12-11
  3. "Working in student recruitment fulfilling yet very stressful. There are metrics that need to be met."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 

    I have been working at Wiley full-time

    Pros

    Environment is great and people are wonderful.

    Cons

    The communication and transparency of upper management to workers

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    Wiley2019-09-03
  4. Helpful (6)

    "Too many organizational changes & upheavals"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Wiley full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Flexibility, great work-life balance for the most part and the Wiley family’s involvement in the business makes the company feel like an extended family.

    Cons

    Way too much politics and cronyism in some upper management teams leading to a few people hoarding power and creating constant organizational/ structural changes that benefit them but affect team morale & create an environment of instability. There are some people who seem to wield a lot of power and authority simply because of who they are friends with. There are some supervisors who play favorites and have a high turnaround rate with people leaving to join other publishers and yet HR does not investigate or conduct exit interviews allowing the dysfunction to continue. When good/ talented people switch teams or leave within a year, it is important to find out why. Also, salaries need to be commensurate with credentials and value to the company, not just number of years spent at Wiley.

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    Wiley2019-03-21

    Wiley Response

    March 28, 2019Director

    Thanks so much for the review! Work/life balance and flexibility is incredibly important so I'm glad you're able to take advantage of that at Wiley. Did you know that we recently launched our Job Architecture program to help employees understand where their role falls within the company's overall structure and to align all roles with industry standards. As a current employee you should definitely check that out (accessible from the company intranet) and if you still have concerns please reach out to your HR business partner. Equality is of the utmost importance! You should also check out the new HR section of the intranet which includes a section for leaving and the exit interviews that you mentioned. Thanks again!

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  5. "Publishing world"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Hoboken, NJ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Wiley full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    work/life balance better than most

    Cons

    workload is overwhelming with no support, upper management says they want to hear from you, but really they don't want to hear the negative, because you are perceived as disgruntled or a complainer. removal of layers has left no room for career advancement

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    Wiley2018-04-27
  6. Helpful (6)

    "Sr. Admissions Advisor"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Admissions Advisor in Oak Brook, IL
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Wiley full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    - Good Benefits - Good training - Hard working admissions staff - Leader in the Industry

    Cons

    - Student first focus has changed to be primarily quantity over quality now - Departments rarely work together - Operations Management is never around (travel or behind closed doors) - Admissions Upper Management is unapproachable - Directors in Admissions run multiple accounts and constantly in meetings leaving little time for staff - Best people have left Admissions Dept or are looking to find a way to leave to join other departments

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    Wiley2018-01-25

    Wiley Response

    March 19, 2018Director

    Thanks so much for the feedback! We agree that culture is an incredibly important part of the workplace and can absolutely drive success. Hopefully you'll continue to see steady improvements and we'll get that four-star review up to five!

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  7. Helpful (18)

    "Get out before you are thrown under the bus b/c of someone else's incompetence"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Maitland, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Wiley full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    -Benefits, PTO -Associates/Mid-level Managers are almost all solid, good people who you can relate to and have good conversations with at the office.

    Cons

    A lot of these reviews have been spot on, but I also want to point out some particular situations based on the Maitland (Orlando) location (which may also coincide with the culture out of the Oakbrook office (Chicago) since they were both formerly "Deltak"- -Be wary of those in upper management, particularly VP level leadership. You should know exactly who these (few) people are if you work/worked there...also that may incorporate a couple "Partnership Directors" (PDs) - however, most of them are now in over their heads with extra work/partners since others in their role have left or "moved on for another opportunity" (aka forced them out of the company). The company has decided to not backfill almost any position, which leads to extra work for those still there, especially employees at the lower level that end up taking on the extra work at their lower salary. -These VPs have single handedly run Deltak (now WES) into the ground. For reasons unknown but assumptions based on quarterly/yearly performance after the merger with Wiley, there is nothing stopping them from making one catastrophic TERRIBLE decision to the next. Many of us presumed that it was specifically tied to their bonus based on conditions of the merger in 2012. They are willing to make any decision regardless of the ill effects on others based solely on their paycheck. -Over the past 2-3 years, salaries have become stagnant. This year, there were no raises for a whole department (not sure if others were also faced with this news). Leaders coach middle-management on how to spin it so that the associates feel like the rest of the world (other companies) are also in the same boat. -VPs in the Maitland office constantly fear communicating news to the rest of the office, so much so that even news that may be viewed as neutral or a change that won't affect them makes associates nervous leaving town hall meetings. When something is going to be negative (like no salary increases for example), you can count on these men to BOMB the message. -These same VPs and a few PDs (as mentioned earlier), have no issues throwing you under the bus for their incompetence. The mismanagement and lack of real understanding of how to work with the partner universities are a daily storyline. The real issue is that anyone underneath upper management has to solve the problems created by them for them. -Multiple people (outside of the few mentioned) have walked into work like it was any other day only to be confronted with information that has been exaggerated (or even misconstrued) to put them on a "performance plan." Witnessing this on multiple occasions, the performance plan is in no way to assist the employee in getting better at their job but using it as a forcible offense to get them out of the company. Whether these decisions are made based on not wanting to conduct real layoffs so they can hit goals set forth by Wiley management- or- because they do not want to further scare anyone left at the company- who really knows. About 95% of the people put into these situations were actually decent at their jobs, so one can only guess that upper management was either threatened by them or they are so delusional they weren't able to see the quality of their work. Whatever the case, it is a huge travesty to the office and to those who worked for/with these employees. -Lastly, there are multiple scenarios of witnessing ageism (both young and older employees) and sexism in the office place. Most of this also coincides with the type of psychological warfare that upper management is gladly willing to partake in order to make you feel inadequate, therefore justifying their treatment toward you and your co-workers. Those shortcomings lie within themselves, but somehow, you will surely walk out of that organization feeling little confidence in your abilities and strengths that you once certainty knew you possessed. Don’t let it get to you though- it’s about them, not you.

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    Wiley2017-09-05
  8. Helpful (25)

    "The end is near! Get out while you can."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Wiley full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Some truly wonderful people work at Wiley. Great work/life balance, awesome PTO.

    Cons

    The company has been "transitioning" for 5 years now but there is no end in sight. Upper management simply doesn't know what they're doing, or what the long game is. They reorg several times a year and undo the actions from the previous reorg. People leave and aren't replaced - that work is just shoved onto the team members who are left. No financial investment being made in the businesses tied to print, but those teams still have numbers to hit, books to publish, and authors to woo.

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    Wiley2017-02-24
  9. Helpful (10)

    "Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Plebe in Hoboken, NJ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Wiley full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The benefits are pretty good.

    Cons

    Everything else. Especially credibility of upper management.

    Continue reading
    Wiley2017-03-03
  10. Helpful (8)

    "Chaos"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Sales Support in Oxford, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Wiley full-time

    Pros

    Wiley's legacy of centuries of publishing languor has left a a relaxed - some would say too relaxed - attitude to targets which makes it a nice place to work if you are hoping to stay unnoticed. The staff environment is pleasant enough and it has an old-fashioned charm. It still clings to the idea that publishing should be an ecumenical and intellectual industry far from the hullaballoo of the modern world. Good food and no insistence on watching the clock beyond the hours set by your contract. Great for workers with young families.

    Cons

    Where to begin? Decades of neglect have left workers with at least three legacy CRMs all providing conflicting information about customers' billing details, and if a customer calls, staff recoil in terror as they know it will take a day of sifting through archival notes on a greenscreen monitor to find out what has happened to their journal. There has been no attempt to modernise the systems or the working environment, and training for new staff members emphasises competence on 1980s systems that are no longer relevant, while ignoring newer developments. It takes at least two years to know where all the files have been stuffed, while promotion is glacial - even for newcomers who have worked in the industry before, they can expect to wait two or more years on a pitiful salary before starting a slow grind toward middle management. All too often the upper management appears to be concerned with "big concepts" and wishful managerial guff (such as imploring their staff to "Take a great leap forward") without actually providing the systems that are so badly needed to achieve this. The information overload for new starters is excessive - several have quit within days of starting once they see how many contradictions and exceptions they are supposed to remember. This is exacerbated by a tendency for team leaders to discourage questions, and a culture of small teams who don't socialise means that you can easily pass two years without knowing many of the names of your co-workers. Most people are simply treading water until they can move on to a better-paid position.

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    Wiley2017-02-13
Found 40 reviews