The Myers-Briggs Company Employee Reviews about "myers briggs company"

Updated Jun 4, 2020

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3.2
48%
Recommend to a Friend
56%
Approve of CEO
The Myers-Briggs Company President and CEO Jeffrey Hayes
Jeffrey Hayes
24 Ratings
Pros
  • "Great team with Talented people(in 5 reviews)

  • "The company has a (historically) solid reputation in the Myers-Briggs name(in 5 reviews)

  • Cons
  • "decision making(in 4 reviews)

  • "professional development(in 4 reviews)

  • More Pros and Cons
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    Reviews about "myers briggs company"

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    1. 2.0
      Current Employee

      Sinking Ship

      Jun 4, 2020 - Anonymous Employee 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      * Some people who remain in the organization still care and try to do the right thing for the company's future * Honestly I cannot think of anything else. Just a handful of people who are still with the company and keeping the lights on, and doing 70% of the real work.

      Cons

      * Dead end for your career. There are no opportunities for career growth and the processes and the way that the work is being done is so far from the industry standards people end up looking for another job for months (if not for years) to make their next move. If they stay, most would lose their motivation and their work becomes subpar. If your manager does not support you or whatever minimum growth you might have in the company, you end up doing the same job for years. * Most employees have a 9-to-5 mentality and there is only a small amount of people who try to do the real work. They burn out, discouraged and unmotivated. The lack of turnover was and still is one of the biggest problems for the company. People have been doing the same job for 10+, 20+ years. This limits or makes it really hard to bring real change * There is zero accountability. There are no consequences if a deadline or revenue target is missed. Company still has the same sales people, who do not have any sales skills and who cannot make their numbers. Sales team is used to selling a single type of product and service to the same customers over and over again, which does not work anymore. They are incapable of change, leadership is incapable of bringing change or taking drastic measures. * The executive leadership team is clueless and they lack actual business experience. Most of them have been with The Myers-Briggs company almost for all of their career so they don’t really grasp how the real world works. They are in meetings all the time but not much comes out of those meetings. CFO makes everything so difficult for everyone. Approach to HR and L&R is a joke. There is no true leadership in product. Same group of people have been trying to solve the company's core problems for years with the same mentality, only making things worse. * The acquisition of the UK partner was a terrible choice for the company. Two companies did not get merged as they were supposed to and still act like two independent entities. There isn't much trust between the two offices. The culture clash between the US and the UK still exists and the leadership cannot figure out how to solve it. Australia and Singapore teams act totally independent. There is no feeling of unity, which is sad since the company spent so much $ and time on the rebrand program. * There are no new products. Zero. The company cannot keep up with the demands of the industry or the customers. They keep updating the old products in different forms, offer new packaging but ultimately offering the same product over and over again. Sadly, they expect to make tons of money out of this genius move, which naturally does not happen. * Myers-Briggs company have become a Benefit corporation during its rebranding. However, the concept is not internalized and people do not understand what it actually means to be a B-Corp. There are only a handful of people who are passionate about B-Corp but they don’t get much support from the leadership team. For the leadership team (or for the Board) being a B-corp is only a lip-service to employees and customers. They don't fully grasp the meaning of being a B-corp, they don't' know how the company should take place in the B-corp community and they do not incorporate the concept to the day to day work or future planning. This is unfortunate since there was such a big hype about becoming a B-corp and now it means almost nothing. * Every decision takes such a long time to make. Company and the leadership team lack the ability to react to the employee and sector's needs or what's happening in the marketplace. Even when a decision is made the damage is usually done. * There is a major disconnect between the mothership and the "innovation lab" (do not let the word fool you, it is not a lab in any sense and they don’t innovate anything). Innovation lab has not been delivering their target since day one but they are presented as the future of the company, while the truth cannot be far from this. The leadership team’s blindness impacts planning and budget decisions which ultimately impacts revenue and employees.

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      11 people found this review helpful

      The Myers-Briggs Company Response

      President and CEO

      Thank you for taking the time to share your perspectives and please accept my apologies for this delayed response. It truly saddens me to read your perceptions of not only myself and the leadership team, but of most of the employees in the company. While I don’t share your perspective about the company (in fact, I think most if not all of your colleagues are working very hard to help us manage through these unprecedented times), I would like to encourage you to reach out to me so that we can discuss your concerns and perspective. I hope that we can connect soon.

    2. 2.0
      Current Employee, more than 3 years

      The Myers-Briggs Company is the Al Bundy of the assessment and L&D space.

      Dec 7, 2019 - Anonymous in Sunnyvale, CA
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      If you're looking for a job, not a rewarding career - then, welcome aboard.

      Cons

      Once the staring quarterback in its high school glory days of the 80 & 90s... fast forward to now: decade-long declines. The company still revels in its one-time popularity and name recognition from when it was the only personality assessment on the block but is clueless how to survive in today's competitive landscape. The market has evolved and next-gen organizations are looking for much more in their people and workforce development. Leadership lacks strategy and is completely unaccountable for their results. The company culture breeds complacency, lacks product innovation and views customers as just a chase for the transactional dollar. The hypocrisy of the products, frameworks and services The Myers-Briggs Company tries to sell into other companies is like no other. When you work here you become accustom to lack of professional development, career growth and experience a culture that is simply forced acronym of "values" that are meaningless.

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      13 people found this review helpful
    3. 1.0
      Current Employee

      Soulless. Ironically, this company could use a healthy dose of self-awareness.

      Dec 2, 2019 - Anonymous 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Witnessing first-hand how our products and services truly make a difference in people's lives. Listening to customers speak to the multiplier effect that comes from using our products inspires me and my teammates to do more for them.

      Cons

      Unfortunately, this is where the inspiration and motivation ends. The toxicity of the culture here is so extreme, so soul-crushing, attempts over to serve the customer over the last several years have become nothing short of Sisyphean tasks. While our narcissistic, staid, authoritarian leadership team extolls the virtues of diversity, self-awareness, and professional development, what our business model is built on, they foist superficial, ego-centric plans upon us chock full of conflicting values and demands. This results in a desperate, fear-based, transactional mode of operating, further fueling our brand’s downward spiral and pushing our offerings closer to commoditization. We've become a paradox for employees and customers. It was once rewarding working for and with CPP, has become hardly worth the effort with the even more narcissistic The Myers-Briggs Company. The state we’re currently in – our toxic culture, our soulless brand, and our smoke and mirrors mode of operating – directly reflects our leadership team’s narcissism. Their exaggerated sense of self-importance creates a major disconnect between our brand and our customers. The leadership team often looks down and belittles what customers and employees share. Instead they’ll boastfully choose to direct the company in the opposite or questionable direction “because we are The Myers-Briggs Company” – with this belief that the world envies them in their roles leading this company and brand. There is this constant need to be recognized as superior even without achievements that warrant it. This translates into constant pressure to deliver exaggerated and questionable outputs. For example, there’s the claim that has been place front and center on our website for years, “People development solutions used by 88 of the Fortune 100 companies”. Not entirely true. This is true for the past six years. Also front and center on our website, an invitation to “join our community of independent consultants”. Not entirely true. We’ve been promising our independent consultant customers a formalized community in the form of a partner program for close to a decade now and have yet to deliver. I could go on and on with these “falsehoods”. The leadership team, particularly our CEO is preoccupied with fantasies about success, power, brilliance, beauty/the perfect mate. This translated to us acquiring our largest distributor in the UK when it would have made much more business sense to acquire a direct competitor and/or an innovative/disruptive startup. But no, against more strategic advice, he was dead set on making us an X million-dollar company at any cost (with this quick and easy acquisition). And did it cost us. In the several years since, we’ve undergone rounds of layoffs (CEO: “this is the last one”) that continue to this day. We’re now left with only a skeleton crew working in our US HQ. Not to mention, our customers have caught on to the devaluing of their importance and have since jumped ship to more advanced and user friendly, customer-centric products. The downward spiral continues. Ironically, we’re now leasing excess office space to startups. As expected with narcissists, situations quickly go awry when it comes to change or criticism. The year-after-year downward spiral has shed light on our CEOs bad decisions, particularly in this year’s performance numbers. Denying his own performance, and the performance of his biggest admirers, where then does he, along with his admirers, shift the blame? They belittle and devalue employees. Ignoring it’s at the core of our business model and failing to see the irony in his message, in a company-wide meeting the CEO announces the freezing of all professional development activities and associated budgets for employees (Note: by design, most of our workforce aren’t trained on our own products). Then he goes on to “motivate” us all to go out and market and sell our professional development products and services to organizations. Yes, this happened. And, as we all walk on eggshells around this place, no one would even dare call him out on his hypocrisy. Needless to say, favoritism and politics are the key drivers for compiling teams to tackle high-profile projects. Employees assigned to these projects receive bigger bonuses and raises. Another correlation: if you speak up on behalf of the customer, you’re deemed confrontational. Read: if you’re here for you and not for the customer, then it’s best to submit to authority. Also critically important to know, if your skin doesn’t match that of the senior management team, don’t even entertain the idea of obtaining any sort of supported professional growth here. Simply lie low, don’t rock the boat. Despite what this place professes, repression rules here. Believe this or experience the unfortunate reality of it.

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      13 people found this review helpful
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