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Amazon Seattle, WA (US)

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Amazon Seattle, WA (US) Reviews

  • "A career accelerator"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager, Product Management in Seattle, WA (US)
    Current Employee - Manager, Product Management in Seattle, WA (US)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Amazon full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Smart people, strong mechanisms, fair compensation, you’ll learn

    Cons

    Bar raising culture can be a challenge for some

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Amazon Seattle, WA (US) Photos

Amazon photo of: Amazon's Doppler Building
Amazon photo of: Dueling pianos at the company holiday party
Amazon photo of: Doppler's community stairs, located on the second floor, offers a tiered seating experience to work and people watch.
Amazon photo of: About 55 percent of Amazon's Seattle employees get to work by riding public transit, walking, biking, or using another alternative to driving.
Amazon photo of: Van Vorst, a historic brick building located in the center of Amazon's Seattle campus, was originally used as a furniture warehouse and livery stable.
Amazon photo of: An Amazon associate fulfills customer orders at a Prime Now hub in Seattle.

Amazon Seattle, WA (US) Jobs

Amazon Seattle, WA (US) Salaries

Salaries in $ (USD)
Average
Min
Max
$134,210 per year
$104k
$162k
$134,210 per year
$104k
$162k
$117,725 per year
$91k
$160k
$117,725 per year
$91k
$160k
$106,693 per year
$86k
$134k
$106,693 per year
$86k
$134k

Amazon Seattle, WA (US) Interviews

Experience

Experience
54%
25%
21%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
44%
23%
19%
8
3
2
1

Difficulty

3.4
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1. Helpful (1590)  

    Software Development Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA (US)
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through other source. The process took 4+ months. I interviewed at Amazon (Seattle, WA (US)) in May 2013.

    Interview

    Called out of the blue, asked if I'd be interested in interviewing. Still not entirely sure how they got my name. Had first phone interview the next week, asked no personal questions, all technical in nature. Total of 3 phone interviews and an in-person trip out to Seattle.

    Took about 4 months start to finish. The people in the in person interview were wonderful. Very smart, laid back, and understanding. Got lunch, small tour of campus, and learned what I'd be doing. Got the offer 2 business days after the in person interview.

    Sadly, I signed a NDA and I respect the terms of that. As such, I can't give you any specific questions, but I'll gladly give you the best advice I have.

    Phone Interviews :

    Phone interviews are sucky by nature. Coordinating a call from west to east coast alone is painful, add the fact that phones just take away the benefits of body language, and just make it harder to hear, and you've got a recipe for disaster. But fear not! Here are some helpful hints, some of which are obvious, some of which are not.

    1. Get ready ahead of time. I just mean, get to the area you'll be doing the interview beforehand. I'd recommend an hour or more, just to get your nerves ready. Breathe, get used to the surroundings, and get everything laid out ahead of time. Which brings me to...

    2. I know it's a "programming" interview, but for the love of all things good, have a pen and paper ready and at your disposal. Bring a backup pen. Much like a printer, the pen will fail at the worst possible time. You may also need a laptop, as I was asked to do "on the fly" programming. But close anything and everything distracting. Speaking of...

    3. Pick a spot where there are no distractions. You'll want your undivided attention on this interview. Don't have BookTweet or FaceSpace or MyGram or that crap open if you have a laptop. And I personally wouldn't pick a public space, you never know when an annoying parent will put their screaming child right beside you.

    4. Breathe. Just breathe. Take a moment, stretch, and remember you got this. If you have trouble hearing, don't be afraid to ask again. Don't be afraid to say you don't know. Do as for clarifications, and state assumptions up front. Always re-state the problem as you understand it.

    As for the content : For the love of God, know what a time complexity is, and how to determine it for any and all code you write. Know the time complexities of all sorts. Know all data structures, how to use them, and properties of each. (Insertion time, deletion, etc) Generally know what heck you're talking about. But don't talk too much. You don't want silence at any point really, but you certainly don't want to let the interviewer not get a word in. Know graph theory, tree theory, and all the fun stuff associated with more "complex" structures. Understand what your language does behind the scenes, as far as GC and compiling go. Know how your language use internal structures to manage the code/objects you write.

    **Continued below**

    Negotiation

    As a recent grad, there wasn't much room for negotiation.

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