Interview Question

QA Analyst Interview

-Mississauga, ON

KUBRA

The guy asked me if I know what the quality means. His example of quality was super-expensive designer bags that his girlfriend impulse-buys on the internet. No, that is NOT a joke. He was visibly not interested in the whole process, I could tell. Not a single technical question, and his answers to mine were vague. My guess is he is a lousy programmer, even though he doesn't have to be one to do his job.

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Interview Answers

4 Answers

0

You can talk to the QA team lead about designer bags from Versace or Burberry, maybe you will have a chance… nothing technical, that's for sure.

Anonymous on

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QA at Kubra are a bit misrepresented. I was also surprised once I found out what they do. They do not test beyond the "does it compile" and a single test scenario written by a developer (sometimes not even that, some things cannot be tested by Kubra, only by client). What they do is migrate code/db from one environment to another (test to prep, prep to prod), that is all. No coding involved whatsoever. I am sorry you applied for something that was not what you expected. If you are good at coding, you should apply for Programmer Analyst or Developer positions.

Anonymous on

1

QA at Kubra are not programmers. They promote code to PREP and PROD. They do not even perform any testing beyond a single test case presented to them on the change request. They use tools to back up, compile and promote the code. That's about it. Its a weird system for QA, in all companies I worked for, QA were the ones doing extensive testing and such.

Anonymous on

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Wow, now that response is interesting ^. "… They do not even perform any testing beyond a single test case presented to them on the change request." Presented by whom? The developer(s) who made the change? This sounds like a unit, or at most a single module test, that must have been preformed by the programmer already during his/her work, and PRIOR to handing the code down to QA. If that's the case, it violates the basic principle of SW testing: developer(s) should have absolutely no influence on how the QA test the software. What if there are certain critical areas that might have been affected by the change? Here's a bit of wisdom from a true SW artist, Mr. E.W. Dijkstra: "Testing can only reveal the presence of bugs, not their absence." Chew on this for a little bit, maybe you will understand what testing is all about. Cheers.

Anonymous on

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