Glassdoor Culture FAQ

Read what Glassdoor employees think about their company culture and make sure it is the right fit for you.

Glassdoor has a culture and values rating of 4.1.

All answers shown come directly from Glassdoor Reviews and are not edited or altered.

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3 English questions out of 3

May 31, 2020

What is the company culture like at Glassdoor?

Pros

Company mission, culture, office snacks, corporate swag, 100% paid benefits, company shares/equity before they sold (I wish you had gone public instead). Severance package is decent and you can keep your laptop.

Cons

This just isn't the same company it was 4 years ago. I have loved Glassdoor, the best company I have ever worked for, but as they have scaled in size, they have also lost some sizzle. I have witnessed this happen to other start-ups that scaled. Some things just feel different at 1000 employees than at 200. I used to feel very confident about the direction of the company and it's leadership. Some of the changes being made right now (May 2020) with Glassdoor, a sister company and the parent company now have me concerned. If it isn't broke, don't tinker with it. My advice is to stick with the same business model that paved the road to where you are today. I am an award-winning, quota-hitting, promoted, top-shelf sales rep who just lost my job to COVID-19. The sales dept was just gutted - aren't sales teams one of the last groups to go in a reduction in force due to an economic downturn? You award me for my efforts and success and then you send me packing. Cut the dead weight instead and keep top performers. I don't get it. My heart is broken. Glassdoor has gone out of it's way to create inclusivity for the LGBTQ+ community. I applaud their efforts and they have done a fantastic job! Unfortunately, Glassdoor put too many eggs in one basket. Black/AA, Asian, Hispanic/Latino, Jewish, Catholic, Christian, etc all take a backseat to LGBTQ+ who is riding shotgun. Glassdoor, have you ever temporarily changed your corporate logo to include the name/colors/logo of any diversity group other than LGBTQ+? Would you change your green logo to black for black history month? Or perhaps add a Cross, Star of David, or Santa hat to the corporate logo during holiday season? No, you wouldn't do those things. But you did incorporate the rainbow colors to your corporate logo during pride month. My advice is to work as hard for other diversity groups as you have done for LGBTQ+. Lastly, employee salaries are below national averages according to Glassdoor's very own "Know your Worth" data and salary info. They try to make up for it in other areas like office snacks, Patagonia swag and benefits.

Advice to Management

Everyone misses the former CEO and co-founder. He was so polished and well-spoken. He demanded such a presence in meetings and on the screen. Those are big and maybe even impossible shoes to fill.

Company mission, culture, office snacks, corporate swag, 100% paid benefits, company shares/equity before they sold (I wish you had gone public instead).

May 31, 2020

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August 12, 2019

How was the interview at Glassdoor?

Pros

Opportunities for internal candidates to be interviewed for promotions and cross functional opportunities

Cons

We do not treat our internal candidates the same as external candidates. Not only was it a multi-month long process but the recruiters paid no attention to the process. The recruiter actually missed our first "interview" with no explanation. It was a less than pleasing process from there. While they provided interview prep, which was welcomed, there was no follow up after any interviews and no expectations set for timelines or feedback. I love working at Glassdoor but if this was an external candidate, this would be a horrible process and first impression.

Advice to Management

We treat our employees outstanding and this should be translated to the internal interview process as well.

The recruiter actually missed our first "interview" with no explanation.

August 12, 2019

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June 5, 2020

What is the hiring process like at Glassdoor?

Pros

Everything in this review, except comments about the recent layoffs and the long term incentive plan, should be considered independently of the effects of coronavirus on the business. My Glassdoor colleagues are kind, and don’t hesitate to help each other when put in a position to do so. The compensation is probably slightly above what would be expected at a company of similar size and industry. The work life balance is excellent, and always has been. The sum total of the work we do is ultimately positive, insofar as we help people find jobs. It’s way better than working at some pathological social media outfit, or selling cheap trash no one needs.

Cons

The first major con should be roundly apparent from reading positive reviews. “No Cons!!” Believe me, there are Cons. We have hemorrhaged talent in the last two years (I will float some ideas why a bit why lower down), and responded with questionable hiring decisions. While there are few, if any, hard-charging bullies and alpha-types at Glassdoor, there are many obsequious and uninquisitive employees. The long term incentive plan (“LTIP”) is probably broken. Coronavirus has exposed how the incentive scheme as structurally uncredible. Personal performance is uncoupled from our business performance. That's how it's supposed to work, perhaps. But even aside from coronavirus, the LTIP is confusing and probably broken, with lower grants occurring after higher performance ratings, ostensibly due to some sort of adjusted coefficient nested into the grant calculus. My manager was not able to explain the LTIP to me during my performance review. I felt bad for her. I was in a meeting a few weeks ago, part of which my husband overheard. He later told me, “I think I know what mansplaining is now…” I laughed. It’s true. Meetings often do sound like a fact auction, with enthusiastic participation by men talking over each other. Speaking of meetings, there are too many of them. Rare is the meeting with any kind of agenda or plan. It happened once a while ago; I remember that meeting. Meetings are constantly called, often ad hoc, and sometimes after work has been completed, because those involved have to figure out what was done and why. Often we will reprise a meeting the next day because the previous meeting solved nothing. It’s a negative feedback loop. It’s not clear what Product is doing or is supposed to be doing; they come across as some kind of wannabe C-suite. The decisions about what Glassdoor's products look like and feel like seem to grow out of wishful thinking, or caricatures of job seekers that don't generalize. My manager told me in my last performance review that the reason I was not promoted was “politics.” When I asked her what I could have done to earn a promotion (or just a high rating), she mumbled something about visibility. That was disappointing.

Advice to Management

Meetings are more often obstructive than constructive. Two cheers to our CMO for instituting a “No Meeting Wednesday” policy. Instead of once every two weeks, we should have No Meeting Tuesday and No Meeting Thursday—every week. Set high expectations for meetings such that the people who run them are well prepared with clear and compelling goals, and forward progress can be made. Desultory meetings are a major problem; a full life-cycle cost analysis of the SG&A lost to meetings likely comes to millions of dollars in squandered productivity every year. Going further, institute a weekly No Slack Day. Recently unveiled Glassdoor “Values” betray a total lack of clarity on what, exactly, the whole point and appeal of using or working at Glassdoor is supposed to be. The stated “Values,” rolled out with much pomp and fanfare but now largely forgotten and impossible to find on the internal wiki, are Transparency, Innovation, Good People and Grit. “Transparency” and “Good People” are not values. Transparency is the absence of all values. It is also the most ubiquitous buzzword in the entire business world as I write this. It is a meaningless and impossible standard. “Good People” is simply a cop out. “Grit” and Innovation” are clichés, but at least they look like values when you hold them sideways and squint. Replacing “Transparency” and “Good People” with, say, Trust and Truth, would be a good start toward reestablishing what it’s all good for. We need strong maternity and paternity leave policies. Two very valuable people expressed to me that the main reason they left was Glassdoor’s feeble parental leave support. More generally, we need to better retain the talent we still have left. Many of our best have left for greener pastures, and we have not replaced them with commensurate talent. Consider scrapping the long term incentive plan altogether, and replacing it with a long-term bonus, indexed to a weighted performance rating over time, with a company performance weight as well if you must. We cannot compete for talent with companies that offer RSUs!

We have hemorrhaged talent in the last two years (I will float some ideas why a bit why lower down), and responded with questionable hiring decisions.

June 5, 2020

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3 English questions out of 3