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Blake, Cassels & Graydon

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Have questions about working at Blake, Cassels & Graydon? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at Blake, Cassels & Graydon.

All answers shown come directly from Blake, Cassels & Graydon Reviews and are not edited or altered.

26 English questions out of 26

February 15, 2022

What is health insurance like at Blake, Cassels & Graydon?

Pros

As a large professional services firm, the organization is well set up to offer a decent extended health benefits plan to full-time employees, and they do. They offered a free ergonomic assessment of the workspace and (for example) provided a standing desk to those who needed it. Free coffee and tea was available on-site from around 7 am until around 6 pm, and there was also a free snack provided once a week (this was pre-pandemic; it may have since changed). Flu shot clinics were offered yearly. Colleagues in the library and on non-legal teams with whom I worked closely were largely excellent and there was great teamwork and cooperation. The firm certainly has longevity; they did very well during the pandemic.

Cons

As a large corporate law firm, there is a firm unspoken social hierarchy. Partners are at the top, followed by senior associates, then early career associates, then law clerks, law students and legal assistants. Non-legal staff are essentially an administrative line item, and while lawyers make it clear they rely heavily on their services, they are not treated as intellectual equals whose labour and expertise are valued, even those non-legal staff who have advanced degrees, such as research librarians and consultants on the business intelligence team, who typically have advanced degrees. The demands are very high both in terms of coverage required and workload, and the job often feels thankless. Work-life balance: my team often received requests on weekends or in the middle of the night from lawyers who were surprised or put out when we didn't answer until 8 am Monday morning. We were consistently asked to extend our hours of coverage and complete large research projects with short turnaround times. I received verbal abuse from a lawyer on two separate occasions. My team lost 1/4 of its staff across all national offices to an unexplained mass layoff during the pandemic, despite the firm having one of its most lucrative years in decades.

Advice to Management

Most of the problems are intractable ones that come with the culture of any corporate firm on Bay Street, with "rockstars" and "rainmakers", and the rest of us. I'm not sure what upper management could really do about this, since for the most-valued employees, the status quo is beneficial.

As a large professional services firm, the organization is well set up to offer a decent extended health benefits plan to full

February 15, 2022

See answer

February 15, 2022

Does Blake, Cassels & Graydon offer health savings accounts?

Pros

As a large professional services firm, the organization is well set up to offer a decent extended health benefits plan to full-time employees, and they do. They offered a free ergonomic assessment of the workspace and (for example) provided a standing desk to those who needed it. Free coffee and tea was available on-site from around 7 am until around 6 pm, and there was also a free snack provided once a week (this was pre-pandemic; it may have since changed). Flu shot clinics were offered yearly. Colleagues in the library and on non-legal teams with whom I worked closely were largely excellent and there was great teamwork and cooperation. The firm certainly has longevity; they did very well during the pandemic.

Cons

As a large corporate law firm, there is a firm unspoken social hierarchy. Partners are at the top, followed by senior associates, then early career associates, then law clerks, law students and legal assistants. Non-legal staff are essentially an administrative line item, and while lawyers make it clear they rely heavily on their services, they are not treated as intellectual equals whose labour and expertise are valued, even those non-legal staff who have advanced degrees, such as research librarians and consultants on the business intelligence team, who typically have advanced degrees. The demands are very high both in terms of coverage required and workload, and the job often feels thankless. Work-life balance: my team often received requests on weekends or in the middle of the night from lawyers who were surprised or put out when we didn't answer until 8 am Monday morning. We were consistently asked to extend our hours of coverage and complete large research projects with short turnaround times. I received verbal abuse from a lawyer on two separate occasions. My team lost 1/4 of its staff across all national offices to an unexplained mass layoff during the pandemic, despite the firm having one of its most lucrative years in decades.

Advice to Management

Most of the problems are intractable ones that come with the culture of any corporate firm on Bay Street, with "rockstars" and "rainmakers", and the rest of us. I'm not sure what upper management could really do about this, since for the most-valued employees, the status quo is beneficial.

As a large professional services firm, the organization is well set up to offer a decent extended health benefits plan to full

February 15, 2022

See answer

February 15, 2022

Does Blake, Cassels & Graydon offer vision insurance?

Pros

As a large professional services firm, the organization is well set up to offer a decent extended health benefits plan to full-time employees, and they do. They offered a free ergonomic assessment of the workspace and (for example) provided a standing desk to those who needed it. Free coffee and tea was available on-site from around 7 am until around 6 pm, and there was also a free snack provided once a week (this was pre-pandemic; it may have since changed). Flu shot clinics were offered yearly. Colleagues in the library and on non-legal teams with whom I worked closely were largely excellent and there was great teamwork and cooperation. The firm certainly has longevity; they did very well during the pandemic.

Cons

As a large corporate law firm, there is a firm unspoken social hierarchy. Partners are at the top, followed by senior associates, then early career associates, then law clerks, law students and legal assistants. Non-legal staff are essentially an administrative line item, and while lawyers make it clear they rely heavily on their services, they are not treated as intellectual equals whose labour and expertise are valued, even those non-legal staff who have advanced degrees, such as research librarians and consultants on the business intelligence team, who typically have advanced degrees. The demands are very high both in terms of coverage required and workload, and the job often feels thankless. Work-life balance: my team often received requests on weekends or in the middle of the night from lawyers who were surprised or put out when we didn't answer until 8 am Monday morning. We were consistently asked to extend our hours of coverage and complete large research projects with short turnaround times. I received verbal abuse from a lawyer on two separate occasions. My team lost 1/4 of its staff across all national offices to an unexplained mass layoff during the pandemic, despite the firm having one of its most lucrative years in decades.

Advice to Management

Most of the problems are intractable ones that come with the culture of any corporate firm on Bay Street, with "rockstars" and "rainmakers", and the rest of us. I'm not sure what upper management could really do about this, since for the most-valued employees, the status quo is beneficial.

Free coffee and tea was available on

February 15, 2022

See answer

February 15, 2022

Does Blake, Cassels & Graydon offer massages?

Pros

As a large professional services firm, the organization is well set up to offer a decent extended health benefits plan to full-time employees, and they do. They offered a free ergonomic assessment of the workspace and (for example) provided a standing desk to those who needed it. Free coffee and tea was available on-site from around 7 am until around 6 pm, and there was also a free snack provided once a week (this was pre-pandemic; it may have since changed). Flu shot clinics were offered yearly. Colleagues in the library and on non-legal teams with whom I worked closely were largely excellent and there was great teamwork and cooperation. The firm certainly has longevity; they did very well during the pandemic.

Cons

As a large corporate law firm, there is a firm unspoken social hierarchy. Partners are at the top, followed by senior associates, then early career associates, then law clerks, law students and legal assistants. Non-legal staff are essentially an administrative line item, and while lawyers make it clear they rely heavily on their services, they are not treated as intellectual equals whose labour and expertise are valued, even those non-legal staff who have advanced degrees, such as research librarians and consultants on the business intelligence team, who typically have advanced degrees. The demands are very high both in terms of coverage required and workload, and the job often feels thankless. Work-life balance: my team often received requests on weekends or in the middle of the night from lawyers who were surprised or put out when we didn't answer until 8 am Monday morning. We were consistently asked to extend our hours of coverage and complete large research projects with short turnaround times. I received verbal abuse from a lawyer on two separate occasions. My team lost 1/4 of its staff across all national offices to an unexplained mass layoff during the pandemic, despite the firm having one of its most lucrative years in decades.

Advice to Management

Most of the problems are intractable ones that come with the culture of any corporate firm on Bay Street, with "rockstars" and "rainmakers", and the rest of us. I'm not sure what upper management could really do about this, since for the most-valued employees, the status quo is beneficial.

Free coffee and tea was available on

February 15, 2022

See answer

May 24, 2020

Does Blake, Cassels & Graydon offer a wellness program?

Pros

Awesome employer and many benefits.

Cons

Long, stressful hours with not much guidance.

Awesome employer and many benefits.

May 24, 2020

See answer
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26 English questions out of 26

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