There are newer employer reviews for Starbucks

 

Awesome place to work

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Store Manager in Roanoke, VA (US)
Current Employee - Store Manager in Roanoke, VA (US)

I have been working at Starbucks full-time (more than 3 years)

Pros

Benefits! They are really great! Retirement, health, Stock etc.

Cons

Sometimes customers are a little over the top demanding but really not that bad

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

4863 Other Employee Reviews for Starbucks (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Lot's of opportunities if enough effort is put forward.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Assistant Store Manager in Washington, DC (US)
    Current Employee - Assistant Store Manager in Washington, DC (US)

    I have been working at Starbucks full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Growth opportunities. Flexible schedule for everyone but the management. Multiple discounts, health benefit plan even for part-timers.

    Cons

    Sales driven environment. Students are account for a big part of (irresponsible) employees.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Train the managers to maintain the sales without putting a pure pressure on baristas.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Fun for Baristas, Hell for Managers

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Store Manager in Marina del Rey, CA (US)
    Former Employee - Store Manager in Marina del Rey, CA (US)

    I worked at Starbucks full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Great benefits package, extensive training, food food service learning experience, perfect "first job"

    Cons

    Working at Starbucks, you're first introduced to their mission statement: "To inspire and nurture the human spirit: one cup, one person, one neighborhood at a time." You are told that Starbucks is about community involvement, creating "inspired moments" with your customers, and selling only the highest quality product. As a barista, you drink the cool aid and live the dream, but as a manager, your experience can be very disappointing.

    If you're thinking of working at Starbucks as a manager, take my warning: this company is all about making money -- a lot of money. Your success will be measured not by the customer experience, but by your business record. Meetings with your district manager will cover every aspect of your business, from how detailed the floor has been scrubbed to whether or not you sold enough breakfast sandwiches to meet promotions goals; but you'll never be asked, "Do your partners enjoy working here? Do your customer enjoy coming here?"

    To succeed as a Starbucks manager, you have to maintain a veil of decency when dealing with all matters related to customers and partners. For instance, if you have an employee who is struggling, you may be told to fire that person immediately, to move on and hire a better candidate rather than work with that person on resolving their issues at work. In this case you might tell the employee, "Hey, you're doing great! But don't be late tomorrow! You rock!" when in reality your district manager is urging you to put together a case to terminate their employment. It leaves a sick feeling in your stomach.

    The other thing you need to be acutely aware of if you're interested in managing for Starbucks is that it is unlike any other food service management position you've ever known. If you've been a restaurant general manager before, this job is NOT FOR YOU. You will be required to work a minimum of 32 hours each week as a barista: making drinks, taking orders, warming sandwiches, and cleaning floors. During this time you won't be able to perform the managerial functions you might be accustomed to: watching your store flow, monitoring inventory, tracking sales, or training your partners. When you sit down with your district manager, saying "I didn't have time" is not an excuse for missing the finer details which you might have wanted to fix. Because of this the job can be very, very stressful, especially for people with prior management experience like myself. I never felt like I had enough time and I was burned out within a year.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Make the experience for management similar to that as a barista.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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