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Interesting projects and great benefits

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - REMS Software Engineer Intern  in  Houston, TX (US)
Former Employee - REMS Software Engineer Intern in Houston, TX (US)

I worked at Schlumberger as an intern for less than a year

Pros

- veyr technically focussed
- good benefits and compensation

Cons

- i ve heard from some full time employees that work life balance may suffer in the future

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Expand your internship program to more of the top schools

Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Approves of CEO

1406 Other Employee Reviews for Schlumberger (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Good Work

    Current Employee - Field Engineer  in  Jakarta (Indonesia)
    Current Employee - Field Engineer in Jakarta (Indonesia)

    I have been working at Schlumberger full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Great work experience
    Company that has many option

    Cons

    Long Hours
    Rigorous Conditions
    No work life balance

  2.  

    Excellent Experience.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Field Engineer
    Current Employee - Senior Field Engineer

    I have been working at Schlumberger full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    This is a company with a very clear vision of what it seeks. Top level management knows exactly what they want, and have known what they wanted for many years now. I was lucky to have joined the company at a time where the expansion was starting to take place, and have witnessed the integration of the newly purchased Schlumberger companies. Integration is not where it stops, however. There is a fusion of the newly purchased companies' equipment into our regular operations.

    Technologically, Schlumberger is at the forefront of most of the segments of services within which it operates. The company prides itself on this. It has been visible to me at the different geomarkets I have operated in and that I have colleagues operating in. The theory of operation of the equipment and the technology is fascinating to learn and exposes you to different petrophysical, geological, geophysical, chemical, quantum mechanical information that is directly relevant in the oilfield.

    There is a humongous, colossal, database inside which you can research anything you want about any of the segments' technologies. There is a strong data consulting services group that helps orient the client's use of the data that is provided by the company and aid them in coming to better choices.

    Also, there are many training programs that can be undertaken by oneself that will teach the person interested about anything that they seek to find out about within the oilfield. There is information about the operation from the process of oil discovery to its characterization to its production and then to its sale and entry into the markets.

    International movement is quite common. I have roomed with a Russian, Brazilian, Indian, American, French, Canadian, Ghanaian, Egyptian and Pakistani during my different assignments. I have been exposed to cultures I would have otherwise been oblivious to. In our 15 person training class, we had 13 different nationalities.

    Over your career, you are guaranteed much movement between technical, sales, recruiting, operations management, training etc... It is a multi-faceted company. If you invest your time in them, they will invest their resources in you. And they are very resourceful.

    One must know how to use his time to make the best out of this company, in order to avoid all the noise that is projected onto him from upper management and those who are unorganized.

    The focus on Service Quality is acute. And the system in place to ensure that SQ is taken care of is one that should be learnt very well. The reporting system is also very good.

    The doors to other companies, especially operators, opens after 2 years with the company, or reaching the SFE level. You will hear many stories of talented ex-SLB people having moved on to Shell, BP, Exxon, Statoil, Saudi Aramco, PetroBras, PEMEX, etc...

    My experience with this company, though limited in time, has been great. It has opened my eyes to not just the oilfield, but also to business operations. It has enabled me to believe that nothing is impossible until all options have been tried, tested and exhausted. It has taught me hard work, although sometimes it was abusive. It has made me demand a high standard of quality from myself, not just at work, but in my day-to-day life. I have become adaptable and have learnt how to adapt fast to ever changing work conditions and locations. I have had to be creative in order to do so.

    At one point, I was completely unhappy. I had become mentally lazy, unmotivated beyond work, gained weight and lost initiative. However, after some thought, I realized that this did not to be the case. With some creativity, I gained the hunger back, start working on myself slowly, applied the lessons learnt at work to my personal life and 3 months later I was on the right track again.

    The compensation is relatively good. Bonus can be great or terrible, it's not consistent. However, after a while, money won't satisfy you, and people will complain that they aren't making enough although they are making $4,000-$5,000 in bonus a month. After a while, to enjoy working for this company, you must not work for the money, you must work to learn the skills required to manage your business unit, maybe this company or maybe your own company. You will also learn how to quickly learn and integrate new concepts if you wish to move on to something new.

    Cons

    The nature of the operation of an oilfield service company is dire as it is. Schlumberger's high standards are geared towards high profile offshore operations, which don't mix well with the spontaneous nature of land operations, especially in high volume locations. Quite often, there is disorganization. The expectations from upper management are high, and there are often too many checklists that need to be checked. They are numerous and quite often detract from the meat of the job.

    Too many interruptions. Some people perceive their time as more valuable than yours, for some reason. Everybody wants to know everything, and they want to know it now! Or they want it done now! Do it! Why not?! They will try their best to get you off of what you're doing to "help them out". This often leads to pressure and ineffectiveness. You must take it upon yourself to make your boundaries known. It will not win you friends, but it will gain you respect for your work.

    When a failure happens, an engineer or person will always be held responsible. Most often, it is the engineer. Sometimes, the blame is ridiculous, unnecessary and uncalled for. However, upper management would like to see a finger pointed, or rather a root cause addressed. This can sometimes be a massive blow to morale in the place of work, often leading to disillusionment with the company. Justified or not, it is your call to make. Sometimes, in life, you are standing in the wrong place at the wrong time. The Government, though, only sees what's written about it. The human element is unfortunately not transcribed in the text.

    Inconsistency is quite common. The nature of the operation can vary greatly within the same country. As in, you would think you are working for a different company by simply moving a few hours in a given direction or a country east, west, north or south. The compensation will vary greatly, the treatment of the employees, the organization, etc... These are all circumstantial and depend on too many variables for me to point a finger on one person. It all boils down to the dollar. If the location is making money, it has the potential to operate efficiently and more importantly effectively. If it's not, there is scrambling. This applies to operations all over the world. However, sometimes even when the money is made, the treatment of the employees and the organization of the place are not necessarily great.

    This boils down to the following: despite the company's great ability to move people around. Sometimes the wrong people end up in an unwanted position, or one they are not qualified for. This story is all too common and of course leads to a less than satisfactory work environment, especially when they are placed in leadership roles.

    There are some preferred nationalities, unfortunately. However, business does require that this be the case. In a world where unemployment is rising and companies support their nationalities, you can't expect anything else. It is demoralizing to some. Not to me.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Work needs to be done on the way we perceive the human element in the organization.

    Finger pointing is damaging to morale and often deals a great blow to morale. The disillusionment too many people have with the company does not reflect the vision or mission-statement of the company.

    Do avoid placing too many people of the same nationality in one place.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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