BNY Mellon Reviews

Updated 18 September, 2014
Updated 18 September, 2014
1,234 Reviews
2.8
1,234 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
BNY Mellon Chairman, President and CEO Gerald Hassell
Gerald Hassell
362 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • I also get to work from home when needed, making the work life balance easier to handle (in 116 reviews)

  • Many good benefits, however, management was not proactive in developing talent (in 61 reviews)


Cons
  • There is no room for GROWTH and the PAY SUCKS OVERALL (in 25 reviews)

  • All the hard works we done are not appreciated by the senior management of the company (in 49 reviews)

More Highlights

Employee Reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1.  

    Frustrating leadership.

    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at BNY Mellon

    Pros

    Very good people work for this firm.

    Cons

    Main challenge is navigating the variety of corporate cultures which is exist due to the lack of integration.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Focus on integrating, focus on the experienced employees, and consolidate the top three tiers of management.

  2.  

    Great Learning Opportunity

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Summer Associate  in  New York, NY (US)
    Current Employee - Summer Associate in New York, NY (US)

    I have been working at BNY Mellon as an intern for less than a year

    Pros

    Trainings, Opportunity to Contribute, Friendly Co-workers

    Cons

    You are a cog in the machine

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Office Culture can be friendly to attract more youth

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  3. 1 person found this helpful  

    Not the Best place to work at

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at BNY Mellon full-time

    Pros

    Has potential to resolve their internal issues.

    Cons

    Very high pressure. Programs put in place without adequate staffing. Few career opportunities in the New York, and other centers of talent, such as London, areas

    Doesn't Recommend
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  5.  

    It's a good company to take entry in Investment banking

    Current Employee - Analyst  in  Pune (India)
    Current Employee - Analyst in Pune (India)

    I have been working at BNY Mellon full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    It has critcal process where you can learn the real inside instead of any thirdparty

    Cons

    The growth is very slow. Special for Analyst to Team lead level. The avarage is more than 4 years

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Need to be more transperant with paramotion polices and procedure

  6.  

    Great Company

    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at BNY Mellon

    Pros

    Loved the people, loved the atmosphere and the job. Such a good company to get your foot in the door. Great 401k, health benefits, etc.

    Cons

    Salary on the lower end for a competitive company.

  7.  

    Lots of turnover, lots of opportunity.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Corporate Actions Senior Specialist  in  Pittsburgh, PA (US)
    Former Employee - Corporate Actions Senior Specialist in Pittsburgh, PA (US)

    I worked at BNY Mellon full-time

    Pros

    Great pay for entry level job, lots of other young professionals, nice social environment, very reasonable 40-hr work week.

    Cons

    Within my division (asset servicing, corporate actions), there was a very high rate of attrition--mostly because people were getting hired to better jobs in other departments, but this meant work was very transient, always lots of meetings and training and often challenging to meet client demands.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8.  

    Accountant

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Fund Accountant  in  Phila, PA (US)
    Current Employee - Fund Accountant in Phila, PA (US)

    I have been working at BNY Mellon full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    The managers are understanding. The management is flexible to work hours when unusual events happen.

    Cons

    Upward mobility seems lacking or priority

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Training program to encourage career development

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9.  

    Intern: IT Support

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Pittsburgh, PA (US)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Pittsburgh, PA (US)

    I worked at BNY Mellon as a contractor for more than a year

    Pros

    Great workforce, friendly bosses, nice offices

    Cons

    Slow to adopt new ideas

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep doing what you're doing

  10.  

    IF you like office politics....

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Jersey City, NJ (US)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Jersey City, NJ (US)

    I worked at BNY Mellon full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    good working arrangements AWA (alternate working arrangements)

    Cons

    the company is extremely political

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    concentrate on work and not on playing political games

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  11.  

    College Recruits Beware: Not for young people with talents & aspirations (especially if you're not from Pittsburgh)

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Applications Developer  in  Pittsburgh, PA (US)
    Former Employee - Applications Developer in Pittsburgh, PA (US)

    I worked at BNY Mellon full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    - The new hire training program for college recruit was extensive; the company heavily invested in the training and the staff that takes care of the newbies are very nice. (the managers couldn't care less, but the staff that works with us everyday are the best part of the company).
    - Not a terrible stepping stone. You can get a significant salary bump when you leave this place (but then again, partially because this place pays so low, one'd expect to learn more from this kind of pay but no... let me cover this in cons)

    Cons

    - what good is the 3 months training when they don't pair you up with departments/managers that actually leverage these skills? we learned about java, spring etc, yet i didn't get to use any of these until I leave the company for my current job. They train you like a developer but use you like a offshore support staff.
    - the training covers a lot of topic, but mostly covers a lot of topic to a shallow extent. YET the manager i was paired up expect me to be able to handle BXP (the internal platform) like an experienced resource, when we covered the topic for maybe 2 days in training. (of course the manager deserves most of the blame for this unrealistic expectation even though he claim to have been misinformed, because even if we had spent most or the entire training period on this, a college recruit is not going to be able to develop on the internal platform like an experienced resource with years of coding at the company -- and frankly if i could, would you still be paying me what you were paying me?!!!!) - but maybe the training dept could've communicated with the future dept better on the expectations, or paired ppl better.
    ----------- which brings me to point 3, the biggest con of my experience, was by far my manager. this has to be broken down to multiple parts.
    3.1 When I mentioned unrealistic expectation above, I wasn't kidding. For the first few weeks I've been at his department, his instruction to me consists of 3 steps: 1. read it up; 2. figure it out; 3. teach it back to me.
    3.2 When he can't meet deadlines or things get difficult on conference calls, he conveniently "forgets"/"not at all recall" things that he has explicitly said in the past, and throws people under the bus at any signs of trouble.
    3.3 Ok this is half him and half the company, but I gonna count this on him because he knows how much (or how little) I get paid, so it's pure bull that he expect from me something that he should expect from someone paid twice as much as I did, be it experience level, willingness to work over time, availability late night and weekends.
    3.4 Again this is half him and half the company, but omg the politics. Office politics are everywhere, but at my current job, my manager deals with it with external teams and never once throw the whole politics bs at his own developers. my ex-manager is another story. it was just a pain to put up with the politics within the group itself. no one ever takes any responsibility for themselves (modeled after the manager of course), everyone always throws everyone else off the bus at the first sign that makes them panic for themselves (and they panic a lot). I know this isn't the case with all the groups in bnym, my friend got matched up with a very nice group - she learns nothing and does no development, which is why she had to leave before I did, but at least the people in her group were nice. ergo I count this one on my ex-manager still.
    4. While I in particular had an unfortunate experience, what I've found in general among the people from the training program is that, this is a job you might like if you're 50-something looking to retire. There's stability. But very little room for growth. If you are a young person out of a good college with aspirations, you might find waiting-for-retirement-with-people-decades-your-senior-yet-probably-the-same-level-as-you just a bit, what should i call it, soul-sucking.
    5. Pittsburgh salary kinda sucks for CS people in general. The cost of living isn't THAT low considering downtown parking or downtown rental (it's low if you buy a house - again, good for older people, not good for young ones). If you have a cs degree at a target school, go for any coastal cities, they don't cost much more but will pay a lot more.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    - I'm grateful how much the company has invested to train the college recruits. It's just a terrible idea to train people and then not leverage the skills trained. This practice positions the company to be a stepping-stone.
    - It might be a good idea to distribute the college recruit to departments with growth, and with at least some younger people. At least have someone just a few years, not decades older than them. It helps if they can see where they will be in 5 years. Most early 20s people don't need/want to see where they will be in 20 years.
    - given that college recruits that hired into the program and not to the department that they'll be stuck with for a year (if they don't leave the company), let there be some kind of communication/interview process/selection on the candidates end to make sure that the department and individual are a good match.
    - might as well reject over-qualified applicants instead of hiring them into a mis-matched program

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

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